UNCHANGED NATIONAL RESULTS

Every system is perfectly designed to get the results it gets.

Paul Batalden, Dartmouth

THE POINT OF THE CHARTS BELOW:
FOR APPROXIMATELY 50 YEARS, RESULTS ARE STATIC.

Something HAS NOT CHANGED.

Something is CONTINUING to cause these very predictable, very consistent results.

We argue, that school districts are continuing to attempt to solve the wrong problem: get unique students to learn at the same pace; that that is causing these results.

SO CALLED "REFORMS" HAVE NOT CHANGED THE SCHOOL SYSTEM.

Many of these initiatives and ideas are quite good and helpful.

NONE of them have made a difference in RESULTS.

This is because these reforms are within the same school system, attempting as it is to solve the wrong problem: get students, who are all wonderfully different, to learn at the same pace.

1983 (Book, report) A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform is the 1983 report of the United States National Commission on Excellence in Education.

1988 (Law) Reauthorization of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a.k.a. “The Nation’s Report Card.”

1989 (Organization) Teach For America

1990 (Technology) Personal Computers common in the home

1992 (Organization) Charter Schools

1994 (Law) Goals 2000 Act – Standards Based Education Reform

1994 (Organization) Kipp Charter Schools

2001 (Law) No Child Left Behind (NCLB)

2008 (Technology) Khan Academy

2008 (Book, report) Disrupting Class by Clayton M. Christensen, Michael Horn, and Curtis Johnson

2009 (Book, report) DRIVE: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink.

2010 (Standards) Common Core Curriculum

2010 (Technology) IPad introduced

2015 (Law) Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)

THOUGH THE RESULTS AREN'T GOOD

IT IS A CREDIT TO SOCIETY THAT THE DATA IS AVAILABLE.

The Nations Report Card, part of the U.S. Department of Education, makes these charts possible.

It reflects VERY WELL on our society that we as a society have chosen to look unflinchingly.

Math - 9 year olds

The Range: a narrow line showing over almost 50 years,
how little the Average score has changed.

Source: NAEP: Average Math Scores and Percentiles - 9 year old students

Math - 13 year olds

The Range: a narrow line showing that over 50 years,
how little the Average score has changed.

Source: NAEP: Average Math Scores and Percentiles - 13 year old students

Reading - 9 year olds

The Range: a narrow line showing that over 50 years,
how little the Average score has changed.

Source: NAEP: Average Reading Scores and Percentiles - 9 year old students

Reading - 13 year olds

The Range: a narrow line showing that over 50 years,
how little the Average score has changed.

Source: NAEP: Average Reading Scores and Percentiles - 13 year old students